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MPP Courses

MPP Core & Elective Courses

MPP students study a core curriculum to give them a foundational knowledge in quantitative and qualitative analysis, governance, the policy process, comparative analysis, and policy implementation. The core curriculum also includes a summer internship in a professional environment.
Fall 2018 MPP1 Timetable
Fall 2018 MPP2 Timetable
Winter 2019 MPP1 Timetable
Winter 2019 MPP2 Timetable

1st Year Core Courses

PPG1000H: Governance and Institutions

This course is intended to provide foundational knowledge of key governance structures and political institutions at the federal, provincial, and municipal levels in Canada. The course will examine the Constitution, the Westminster parliamentary system, federalism, and the courts. In this course, students will consider emerging challenges to existing institutions, including the rise of cities, demands for self-government among Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples, and the transition from government to governance, and will conclude by reflecting on the quality of Canada’s democratic institutions in comparative perspective.

It is taught in two concurrent sections, by two instructors.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructors
J. Craft
G. Eidelman

Notes
Required of all first year students. (Both sections of this course will be offered in the Fall term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)

PPG1001H: The Policy Process

This core course in the MPP program aims to help students understand the connection between politics and public policy by making sense of the political environment in which policy decisions are made, and the political forces at work throughout the policy process. The course proceeds in two parts. First, students explore foundational theories of policy making that seek to capture the role of organized interests, the importance of political institutions, and the influence of ideas and ideology. Part two builds on this theoretical foundation by focusing on each specific “stage” of the policy process, investigating how policy issues emerge, agendas are set, programs designed and implemented, and outcomes evaluated. Particular attention is paid to how well theories of human motivation and rational decision making apply to real-world experiences in public policy.

Term
Spring (1st year)

Instructors
T. Triadafilopoulos

Notes
Required of all first year students. (There will be two section of this course offered in the Fall term.)

PPG1002H: Microeconomics for Policy Analysis

This is a course in microeconomic theory for students in the MPP program at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy. One objective of the course is to provide students with a foundation in microeconomic analysis and to demonstrate how it can be used to develop and evaluate public policy. Another objective is to increase students’ economic literacy and comfort with economic arguments. The course is designed to be accessible to all students, including those with no previous exposure to economics.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructors
M. Baker
K. Kroft

Notes
Required of all first year students. (Both sections of this course will be offered in the Fall term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)
*Prerequisite: Knowledge of high school mathematics, particularly algebra, working with graphs and fractions.

PPG1003H: Macroeconomics for Policy Analysis

The purpose of this course is to give MPP students a non-technical and broad-based understanding of macroeconomics and the tools of macroeconomic policy analysis.There are at least two reasons why macroeconomics is part of the MPP program: First, some MPP students will eventually wind up working on macro policy issues. Second, even those who do not will find that their policy work takes place in a broader macroeconomic environment that will inevitably affect them and that they need to understand.

Term
Spring (1st year)

Instructors
P. Dungan

Notes
Required of all first year students.

PPG1004H: Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis

The central objective of this course is to equip students with the tools necessary to tackle issues that involve the empirical analysis of public policy problems of the sort they might encounter in a professional environment. The course will cover probability theory and statistics, with a focus on the sensible application of methods to deal with empirical problems using appropriate data.

The course is designed with twin objectives in mind. The first is to provide students with the ability to analyze critically the empirical analysis done by others at a level sufficient to make intelligent decisions about how to use that analysis in the design of public policy. The second is to provide students with the skills necessary to perform empirical policy analysis on their own or to participate on a team involved in such an empirical analysis.

Term
Fall (1st year)

Instructors
G. Frazer

Notes
Required of all first year students.

PPG1005H: The Social Context of Policy-Making

This course examines the social and political context of policymaking – that is, how social and political institutions and actors shape policies, and why do policies end up looking the way they do (i.e., their intended or unintended social and political outcomes).In addition to exposing students to important theoretical and empirical debates, the course will examine contemporary issues affecting social policy. This course will cover numerous social policy domains throughout the course ranging from economic inequality, to health and disability, to immigration.

Term
Spring (1st year)

Instructors
I. Peng (Lec. 0101)
A. Perkin (Lec. 0102)
D. Pettinicchi (Lec. 0103 & 0104)

Notes
Required of all first year students. (All four sections of this course will be offered in the Spring term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)

PPG1007H: Putting Policy into Action: Strategic Implementation of Public Objectives

This is a foundational course in professional policy practice. It is interdisciplinary, drawing on key concepts from science, social science, business and public administration as well as the world of the policy practitioner. This course introduces students to thinking in a critical, integrated way about how to deliver on public policy objectives in the context of a dynamic political and stakeholder environment. Specifically, it examines key considerations in developing an implementation strategy for a policy initiative.

Term
Spring (1st year)

Instructors
TBA (Lec. 0101)
J. Mason (Lec. 0102)
D. Fagan (Lec. 0103 & 0104)

Notes
Required of all first year students. (All four sections of this course will be offered in the Spring term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)

PPG1008H: Program Evaluation for Public Policy

This course will introduce students to both quantitative and qualitative methods in program evaluation for public policy.  Students will gain an understanding of when and how to use various methods of program evaluation and will be exposed to both theoretical concepts and case studies.

This core course will be co-taught in the Spring term. The first 6-weeks will be taught by Professor Jonathan Hall, followed by 6-weeks of instruction by Professor James Radner.

Term
Spring (1st year)

Instructors
J. Hall
J. Radner

Notes
*Prerequisite: PPG1004H.
Required of all first year students. (Both sections of this course are in the Spring term, and students will be graded individually by the instructors in each part of the course.)

Internship

PPG2006Y: The PPG Internship

Students are required to complete a policy internship between the first and second year of study, or as otherwise tailored to meet the needs of the student and of the placement setting. Under faculty supervision, the internship allows students to apply their knowledge to significant problems in the public, private or non-profit sectors, and provides students the opportunity to develop and enhance skills in respective areas of professional interest.

The internship helps students clarify their career direction, gives perspective on classroom learning, and assists students in gaining experience and establishing networks of great value in securing employment after graduation. Internships may be voluntary or paid work experiences that relate to any aspect of policy planning, analysis, decision-making and implementation.

School staff work individually with students to help them identify and secure internships appropriate to their program and their career needs and goals. The School promotes and welcomes partnerships with government, community and private sector organizations seeking to provide internship opportunities to MPP students.

Upon completion of the internship, each student submits a written research report to their faculty supervisor providing an original analysis of the policy and/or organizational issues dealt with during the internship. These reports, which may be in the form of case studies, will be evaluated by the faculty supervisor on a credit/no credit basis and may be made available to first year students for review and to teaching faculty, hiring organizations and other practitioners.

Term
Summer

Instructors
Faculty Advisors as selected during the internship process.

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all first year students.
Students with outstanding PPG2006Y requirements may enroll in PPG2001H and elective courses (only), in the Fall term of their II-year of MPP studies. (Students with outstanding Internship requirements may enroll in PPG2002H, PPG2003H, PPG2008H and PPG2022H in the Winter term of their II-year of MPP studies.)

2nd Year Core Courses

PPG2001H: Integrating Seminar: Legal Analysis in Public Policy

SECTION I: Fall

Energy Policy

Course Description

Energy policy lies at the centre of economic development, environmental sustainability, First Nations reconciliation and retail politics.  It is complex and difficult.
Ontario’s current energy policy structure was implemented in the early 2000s.  It was based on a belief in markets and regulatory independence.  This was consistent with, and drew ideas from reforms in Europe and the United states.  Although, in practice, Ontario policy was inconsistent with its founding ideas, there has not been a fundamental reconsideration of these premises.
This course will examine the history and ideas informing energy policy in Ontario and other jurisdictions for the purpose of exploring new ways to conceive of and manage the challenges of regulating energy.  Specific issues to be addressed include:
– The federal and provincial frameworks for energy supply;
– Institutional governance in energy regulation;
– The role of different technologies in energy systems;
– The challenges posed by renewable power to electricity markets; and
– The rise of distributed generation and alternative technologies

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
TBA

SECTION I: Spring
Property Law and Cities

Course Description

This course explores the relationship between property law and policy in cities. There is a mutual dependence between owners and government in cities. Cities today lean on owners to support the provision of local public goods in a variety of ways, whether it is shovelling snow, maintaining POPs (privately owned public spaces) or financing public goods. Property owners rely on cities to provide the framework within which they use property, build communities, and maintain property values. The interaction between cities, owners and non-owners generates a variety of conflicts for decision-makers to resolve but also produces tools and opportunities for cities.
The object of the course is to introduce students to the fundamental building blocks of property law as it bears on how we live together in cities.  The course will begin with a survey of the basic structure of property rights, such as ownership, tenancies, easements, covenants, air-rights, etc. It will then introduce students to the legal concept of the city and in particular the powers of local government in relation to owners, including the powers to take, regulate and tax property in cities.
Building on this foundation, we will go on to consider how property law shapes policymaking on a range of issues relating to homelessness, access to public housing, aboriginal rights, and land use and urban development in general.  We will also study how the law relates to the financing of public goods and the allocation of benefits and burdens of membership in urban communities.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
L. Katz

OR

SECTION II: Spring
Canadian Migration Policy

Course Description

Who gets in? Who is removed? And what are our conceptions and misconceptions of both groups? As national borders dissolve for trade, capital, communication and culture under globalization, these same borders acquire increasing salience in controlling the movement of people. Migration control thus emerges as the ‘last bastion of sovereignty’.

This course focuses on Canadian policy, law and practice designed to manage and regulate entry, residence and citizenship. The policy answers to the question ‘who gets in?’ will be analyzed in terms of history (who got in to Canada in the past?), current trends (upon what characteristics does Canada currently assess those that wish to get in?), and critical perspectives (how do class/race/ ethnicity/gender affect who gets in?).

The course will examine the role of international and constitutional arrangements in determining the role played by different levels of government (United Nations, federal, provincial and municipal) in immigration, as well as the division of labour between the legislator, the executive and the courts in making and interpreting the rules.

Students will become familiar with the structure of Canadian immigration policy, and the mechanism by which immigration law organizes people into a series of categories and sub-categories: legal/illegal; temporary/permanent; economic/family class; voluntary/coerced etc. Class discussions will be encouraged to critical examine Canadian immigration policy and current events.

The Immigration Refugee Protection Act, Regulations and online Immigration Manual provide the framework for categorizing potential entrants into legal vs. non-legal, visitors vs. permanent residents, and immigrants vs. refugees. These legal instruments set the terms of admission and exclusion, and the processes by which the state makes and implements these determinations.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
TBA

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students. Please note that courses offered under the “Integrating Seminar: Legal Analysis in Public Policy” seminar series are subject to change with each new academic year.

PPG2002H: Integrating Seminar: Applied Economics

SECTION I: Summer 2018
Public Finance

Course Description

This course will look at the motivation and operation of major spending programs and revenue-raising tools of Canadian governments. It will explore rationales for government action such as externalities, information failures, redistribution and macroeconomic management, and the principal-agent problems that affect the design, financing and delivery of programs in areas such as healthcare, education, retirement income, and intergovernmental transfers. A key focus of the course is using financial statements and other reports to understand governments’ behaviour and mitigate principal-agent problems.

Term
Summer (2nd year)

Instructor
M. Oschinski

OR

SECTION I: Fall
International Development

Course Description

This course will explore international development from the perspective of practice. We examine central questions – why so many people are in deep poverty and what can be done about it – by considering the practical levers available to program leaders and policy makers. The course will therefore approach these large questions by iterating between two points of view: first, practical case studies, and second, conceptual frameworks and analytical readings. Students will participate in the interchange, as we progressively deepen our understanding of the core questions. We will interrogate a multi-disciplinary literature from the perspective of cumulative experience in development and immediate issues facing practitioners; we aim for a perspective that enables practitioners to adapt to and learn from the dynamic, uncertain environment in which they must work.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
J. Radner

SECTION II: Fall
Public Finance

Course Description

This course will look at the motivation and operation of major spending programs and revenue-raising tools of Canadian governments. It will explore rationales for government action such as externalities, information failures, redistribution and macroeconomic management, and the principal-agent problems that affect the design, financing and delivery of programs in areas such as healthcare, education, retirement income, and intergovernmental transfers. A key focus of the course is using financial statements and other reports to understand governments’ behaviour and mitigate principal-agent problems.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
TBA

OR

SECTION I: Spring
Public Finance

Course Description

This course covers material on (I) Welfare Economics and Incidence and Efficiency Cost of Government Policies, (II) Taxation and Redistribution, (III) Social Insurance, (IV) Economics of Mandates. The emphasis will be on the theoretical and empirical evaluation of public policy. The course will be a project-oriented capstone course, designed to give students a background in the economic analysis of public policy, with a focus on empirical (evidence-based) analysis.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructor
K. Kroft

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.
Courses offered under the “Current Issues/Problems in Public Policy and Practice” seminar series are subject to change with each new academic year.

PPG2003H: Integrating Seminar: Capstone Course: A Canadian Priorities Agenda: Process, Criteria, Choices

This course is intended to draw on the skills, analytic approaches, and policy knowledge that students have acquired over the course of the MPP program and to bring them to bear on the development of a coherent policy agenda for the current Canadian context.

The course is modelled after the Institute for Research and Public Policy’s Canadian Priorities Agenda (CPA) project, updated to account for the dramatic shifts in the policy environment since the original CPA exercise in 2007. The CPA brought together a group of “agenda-setters” to set priority areas for action, researchers who made proposals for particular policies within each priority area, and a panel of “judges” who recommended new policy agendas for Canada by choosing from among the proposals presented. In this course, the student will act as all three—agenda setters, proponents and judges—in developing and defending an agenda of three policies for their final course assignment.

Unlike in past years, there will be no policy menu from which students choose their options. Rather, the student will conceive, design, develop and justify their own policy options and integrated agenda for improving the economic and social well-being of Canadians. Invited speakers will suggest important policy areas, but they will not necessarily be included in a student agenda.

The course will ask students to showcase integrative thinking, and make reasoned policy choices in the face of budgetary realities and political constraints. Students are expected to engage critically and meaningfully with the material and information presented through course assignments and in breakout groups.

By the end of the course, it is expected students will be able to balance and articulate the political, economic, social, fiscal, and intergovernmental needs and constraints of policymaking in Canada. Additionally, it is expected that by the end of the course students will be able to moderate the complexities of policymaking to address the question: what mix of policy options will most improve the social and economic wellbeing of Canadians?

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
M. Cappe
A. Siddiqi
L. White
TBA

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 5.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.

PPG2008H: Comparative Public Policy

SECTIONS I & II: Fall & Spring

This course is designed to expose MPP students to the scholarly literature on public policy across a wide range of countries. Through the study of public policy in other countries, students will deepen their knowledge of public policy, even Canadian policy.

Major theories and research paradigms will be examined, with a focus on the relationship between theory, research design and measurement. Emphasis will be on comparing wealthy countries, though policies from the developing world will be drawn upon as well. To begin the course will examine the sources of public policy, asking how institutions, ideas and interests shape policy. Then, the course will turn to how policy shapes society, thinking carefully about how we measure policies and how we distinguish outputs from outcomes.To focus the course study, students will explore two policy areas in depth. (Students interested in other areas will have many chances to engage with the relevant literatures.)

There will be somewhat different themes between the two instructors’ sections (Fall/Spring). While there will be quite a bit of overlap, students who have a strong interest in one of the following themes, should note:
– Fall sections (Prof. Donnelly): will focus on comparative diversity and migration policies, covering both causes and consequences
– Spring sections ( Prof. White): will focus on comparative inequality and welfare state policies, also examining both causes and consequences

Term
Fall (2nd year)
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
M. Donnelly (Fall)
L. White (Spring)

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Required of all second year students.

PPG2011H: Ethics and the Public Interest

MPP students are to complete either PPG2011H or PPG2022H.

Course Description

Ethics and The Public Interest provides a range of frameworks, drawn from a variety of cultural perspectives, for analyzing and managing the complex ethical dilemmas that public officials confront. It is a course in politically-informed moral reasoning.

The practice of public administration is widely understood to be guided by certain core values and principles. Yet with the growing complexity of the state have come changing demands, structural reforms, and the creation of a more uncertain environment. Participants in this course will be provided with a set of intellectual tools for responding to this new environment, and for thinking about such issues as ethical leadership, public accountability, relating to ministers, and dealing with vague or inconsistent demands. It is organized around discussion of two major issues: first, it asks what values should guide decision-making in areas of administrative discretion; second, it looks at questions of compliance, in order to explore ways that the public service can continue to meet the highest standards of professional ethics.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructors
J. Heath

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Second year students are required to register in the second year core PPG2011H OR the second year core PPG2022H.

PPG2022H: Moral Foundations of Public Policy

MPP students are to complete either PPG2011H or PPG2022H.

Course Description

Moral questions abound in framing public policy.  What are the legitimate aims of the state?  How should costs and benefits of policy choices be measured and distributed across the population?  And what ethical constraints are there on the pursuit of state aims? This course will explore these theoretical questions in the context of several distinct policy areas, including health care, environmental protection, tax and economic policy, family policy, and drug control.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
A. Franklin-Hall

Notes
*Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least 3.5 FCEs in MPP1 courses
Second year MPP students are required to register in either PPG2011H OR PPG2022H.

*Enrollment in Core PPG courses is not available for students outside of the MPP program.

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2nd Year Elective Courses

Students can pursue their specific policy interests through a selection of elective courses either at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy or through other departments at the University of Toronto.

PPG2010H: Panel Data Methods for Public Policy Analysis

The goal of the course PPG2010H is to introduce students to statistical methods for the analysis of panel large-scale data. Topics include an introduction to panel data and panel design, statistical modeling of panel data including growth curve models, multilevel linear models and generalized linear mixed models.

At the completion of this course students will be able to:

  • Conduct data management and manipulation procedures to prepare large-scale longitudinal data for statistical analyses
  • Understand the structure of major RDC longitudinal datasets
  • Formulate research problems and select appropriate statistical procedures to address them
  • Utilize statistical software to perform longitudinal analyses on large-scale longitudinal datasets
  • Interpret and communicate the results of statistical analyses
  • Critically evaluate published research papers based on longitudinal data analysis techniques.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
O. Falenchuk

Notes
1. Pre-requisite for enrollment: Security clearance with finger print to access Government data.
2. Given fingerprinting requirement of students for security clearance, enrollment in PPG2010H closes on Aug. 10 (i.e., 4 weeks prior to the first class).

PPG2012H: Topics in Public Policy: Making an Impact from the Outside (Evergreen Experimental)

This limited-enrolment, six-week intensive course will expose students to public policy making from the perspective of non-governmental organizations and provide students with the skills necessary to achieve policy change from outside government. Delivered in partnership with Evergreen, a national charitable organization with a mandate to create sustainable communities, students will learn strategies to drive community-led policy initiatives by blending theoretical concepts with concrete skills to work with diverse communities, such as: design thinking, stakeholder management, public consultation, campaign building, and strategic communication. The course will take students out of the classroom and into the community through site visits, field assignments, and close interaction with experienced practitioners.

Classes will be held on Wednesdays in the winter term, from late January to early March, with the majority of sessions hosted at Evergreen Brick Works (accessible by transit and shuttle bus).

January 23, 1-4 p.m. at the School
January 30, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Evergreen Brick Works
February 6, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Evergreen Brick Works
February 13, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Evergreen Brick Works
February 27, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Evergreen Brick Works
March 6, 1-4 p.m. at the School

Registration is capped at 12 students. Interested students must submit a short (max. 200 word) application explaining their interest in community-based policy making, what they hope to gain from the course, and what they can contribute to the group. Please direct applications to Prof. Gabriel Eidelman (g.eidelman@utoronto.ca), who is also available to answer any questions.

The application deadline is Friday, July 6 at 5 p.m. A final class list will be communicated to applicants by July 12, in advance of course registration.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
G. Eidelman

PPG2013H: Regulatory Governance

The learning objective for this course is to provide students with an understanding of how renewable energy fits within the institutional, reliability and economic structure of energy policy.

This course is also designed to provide students with a multi-dimensional framework to critically address the way in which renewable energy contributes to meeting and shaping energy systems. That is, there are many policies encouraging renewable energy throughout Canada and the world; this course helps students to understand what these policies are, and to consider whether these are a good idea.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
G. Vegh

PPG2015H: Policy Development

Governments face a vast array of complex issues. Public policy professionals are constantly evaluating problems, analyzing issues and proposing solutions.

This course is designed to expose students to the public policy development process, including framing an issue, evaluating important internal and external considerations, developing and analyzing viable options, understanding short and long term consequences of a policy choice, and developing a workable implementation strategy.

The course will involve a combination of lectures and participation on a policy team to address pressing challenges facing government. Students will develop several policy decision-making documents, including a detailed Cabinet Document or Policy Paper in an interactive setting that simulates a realistic policy development process. Students will be exposed to the full range of policy development tools.

Term
Winter (2nd year)

Instructor
B. Graham
B. Hughes

PPG2017H: Urban Policy

The goal of this course is to unravel the various policy challenges and possibilities created by our increasingly urban world. Cities are fundamental features of contemporary civilization. More and more, issues of good governance, citizenship, economic growth, social equity, and environmental sustainability are being confronted by municipalities and city regions, not states. This course provides an overview of some of the major policy debates surrounding this new urban reality. While Toronto and other Canadian cities will be strongly featured in readings and discussions, cities in the US, Europe, and the global south will also be examined.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
R. Stren
G. Eidelman

Notes
The course will be taught as a seminar, with ten weeks devoted to substantive topics, and two final weeks for student presentations.

PPG2018H: The Role of Government

This course explores the complexity of current government policymaking in a comparative perspective. Students will examine the rationales for and the limits to government intervention and will identify the policy levers available to government actors in a dynamic political context. The course explores the government’s role in the financing and delivery of public policy goals while balancing concerns of efficiency and equity. Students will explore substantive and procedural issues in a range of major policy areas such as trade, security, redistribution, health care, the environment, indigenous peoples issues and urban policy.

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructors
M. Cappe
B. Rae

Notes
This will be a joint graduate-undergraduate (PPG401H) course. As a joint graduate-undergraduate course the graduate students will be required to do some additional graded work (i.e., graduate students will required to render a more significant final paper with a substantive research component).

PPG2021H: Priority Topics in Public Administration

Special Intensive course for Winter 2019 (only) “Public Leadership and Transformative Public Policy”

This course is focussed on public leadership and transformative public policy. What kinds of leaders – at all levels – are able to drive change? What are the traits of successful leaders, and how do these differentiate them from other leaders? What are the practical constraints they face? How do they deal with challenges of accountability, team work, agenda setting, implementation, etc, to effect large scale change? Closer to home, how can people who are entering the public service both act as leaders themselves and help their own leaders realize transformative change?

Our course will have three components. First, an intensive section at the beginning of the semester that immerses students in academic and practical readings on various aspects of leadership. This will occur over five two hour seminars. These will culminate with students developing their own boiled-down understanding of what constitutes effective and transformative leadership constitutes. Second, a self-directed section in which groups of 2-3 students will work on completing two case studies. One on a successful or unsuccessful public sector or policy transformation, and a second on a case study/biography of an effective public sector leader, which might involve original research, interviews, etc. This element is hands on and practical. Third, a series of lunch time meetings with public leaders from Canada, including deputy ministers, former premiers, and justices, and two transformative leaders from other countries.

Term
Spring (2nd year) ~ intensive schedule
– Jan. 21-25:
Monday, Jan. 21, Tuesday, Jan. 22, Wednesday, Jan. 23 and Friday, Jan. 25 from 8-10am in CG-361
Thursday, Jan. 24 from 8-10am in Transit House Classroom at Munk – Observatory
– Monday, Feb. 25 from 9-11am in CG-361
– April 2-5:
Tuesday, April 2 and Wednesday, April 3 from 2-4pm in CG-160
Thursday, April 4 from 2-4pm in Transit House Classroom at Munk – Observatory
Friday, April 5 from 2-4pm in CG-361

Instructors
P. Loewen
Y. Baltacioglu

LAW7030H (LAW281H1): Issues in Indigenous Law and Policy in Canada

A joint course of the Faculty of Law and School of Public Policy and GovernanceLAW7030H will deal with selected issues in Indigenous law and policy in Canada.

The objective of this course is to bring together students from two faculties, law and public policy, and to encourage discussion about the nature of the relationship between Canadian governments and Indigenous communities through an approach that deals with history, contemporary issues, and the leading legal cases in this complex and ever changing field.

Term
Fall (2nd year)

Instructor
B. Rae

Note
This course is cross-listed with the Faculty of Law, for more course information click here.

HAD5778H: Comparative Health Systems and Policy

Each country’s health system and policies are largely shaped by historical, political, social and economic contexts;

Each country’s health system and policies are largely shaped by historical, political, social and economic contexts; but in general, they face similar challenges such as rising expenditures, limited accessibility and public health and health system threats from both communicable and non-communicable diseases. The comparative health systems and policy course is intended to capture the rapidly expanding field of comparative studies in health systems and policy. It will provide a comprehensive methodological foundation to understand why we compare health systems in different countries or provinces within a country, and what we can learn from those comparisons. In the second part, the course will provide specific examples of health system and policy development in high income countries, and low-and-middle- income countries (LMICs). This is an advanced course and should only be taken once a student has completed the course on Canada’s health care system and, if possible, a course on public policy or health policy theories. Although this is a taught course, the main requirement is to complete a major paper applying theoretical and methodological tools to a comparative health systems or comparative health policy case study including two or more jurisdictions (a province/state and/or country).

Term
Spring (2nd year)

Instructor
G. Marchildon

Note
This course is cross-listed with Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (IHPME)

Please note that elective courses are subject to change with each new academic year.

*MPP Policy for Non-Departmental Enrollment in PPG Courses*
Non-departmental students may request enrollment in Elective PPG courses (not Core PPG courses).
If the elective course is not fully subscribed, enrollment requests may be submitted 4-weeks prior to the start of each term. Enrollment is at the discretion of the MPP Program Office and the course instructor. Once a non-departmental students has verified elective courses space availability, s/he may submit an SGS Add Drop Course Form listing the course(s) in which s/he would like to enroll by email public.policy@utoronto.ca.

NB: The MPP program does NOT permit for either core or elective courses to be audited.